The Science of Erythritol

What scientific evidence is there to support the use of Erythritol?

  • Prevents premature aging by not sticking to proteins and protecting against free radicals.
  • Provides energy to the brain even when insulin resistance is present, aiding concentration, focus, and memory.
  • Supports cardiovascular health by not damaging blood vessels, increasing good cholesterol, and reducing inflammation.
  • Does not damage cell structures, reduces wrinkles by promoting blood flow and skin elasticity.
  • Provides smooth and sustained energy without causing drops in mental or physical performance.
  • Galactose promotes the growth of good bacteria that help remove toxic ammonia in the body. It also protects the gut from leaks and harmful pathogens like fungi and yeast that cause inflammation.
  • Galactose structures in the body help produce immune lectins. It reduces the replication of viruses and pathogens by removing their fuel source. Galactose has minimal impact on autophagy, which allows the immune system to function properly and keep cells healthy.
  • Galactose doesn't cause insulin elevation because it's not needed for cellular transport. This can help reduce insulin resistance by giving the body a break from using insulin-dependent energy systems.
  • Galactose is metabolized in the liver without using insulin, so it doesn't lead to fat deposition in the liver. Animal studies show that galactose can reduce liver inflammation and improve insulin sensitivity and glycogen storage when replacing just 15% of sugar intake.
  • Galactose provides the building blocks for creating tissues in the brain and nervous system, specifically cerebrosides, gangliosides, and mucoproteins. Galactocerebrosides are the main glycoprotein in neuronal myelin, insulating neurons to ensure effective signal transmission.
  • Galactose stops bad bacteria from attaching to tooth enamel, which prevents the formation of plaque and reduces dental caries and cavities. It also protects teeth from mineral loss and enhances oral health while reducing inflammation and preventing bad breath.
  • Prevents premature aging by not sticking to proteins and protecting against free radicals.
  • Provides energy to the brain even when insulin resistance is present, aiding concentration, focus, and memory.
  • Supports cardiovascular health by not damaging blood vessels, increasing good cholesterol, and reducing inflammation.
  • Does not damage cell structures, reduces wrinkles by promoting blood flow and skin elasticity.
  • Provides smooth and sustained energy without causing drops in mental or physical performance.
  • Galactose promotes the growth of good bacteria that help remove toxic ammonia in the body. It also protects the gut from leaks and harmful pathogens like fungi and yeast that cause inflammation.
  • Galactose structures in the body help produce immune lectins. It reduces the replication of viruses and pathogens by removing their fuel source. Galactose has minimal impact on autophagy, which allows the immune system to function properly and keep cells healthy.
  • Galactose doesn't cause insulin elevation because it's not needed for cellular transport. This can help reduce insulin resistance by giving the body a break from using insulin-dependent energy systems.
  • Galactose is metabolized in the liver without using insulin, so it doesn't lead to fat deposition in the liver. Animal studies show that galactose can reduce liver inflammation and improve insulin sensitivity and glycogen storage when replacing just 15% of sugar intake.
  • Galactose provides the building blocks for creating tissues in the brain and nervous system, specifically cerebrosides, gangliosides, and mucoproteins. Galactocerebrosides are the main glycoprotein in neuronal myelin, insulating neurons to ensure effective signal transmission.
  • Galactose stops bad bacteria from attaching to tooth enamel, which prevents the formation of plaque and reduces dental caries and cavities. It also protects teeth from mineral loss and enhances oral health while reducing inflammation and preventing bad breath.
  • Prevents premature aging by not sticking to proteins and protecting against free radicals.
  • Provides energy to the brain even when insulin resistance is present, aiding concentration, focus, and memory.
  • Supports cardiovascular health by not damaging blood vessels, increasing good cholesterol, and reducing inflammation.
  • Does not damage cell structures, reduces wrinkles by promoting blood flow and skin elasticity.
  • Provides smooth and sustained energy without causing drops in mental or physical performance.
  • Galactose promotes the growth of good bacteria that help remove toxic ammonia in the body. It also protects the gut from leaks and harmful pathogens like fungi and yeast that cause inflammation.
  • Galactose structures in the body help produce immune lectins. It reduces the replication of viruses and pathogens by removing their fuel source. Galactose has minimal impact on autophagy, which allows the immune system to function properly and keep cells healthy.
  • Galactose doesn't cause insulin elevation because it's not needed for cellular transport. This can help reduce insulin resistance by giving the body a break from using insulin-dependent energy systems.
  • Galactose is metabolized in the liver without using insulin, so it doesn't lead to fat deposition in the liver. Animal studies show that galactose can reduce liver inflammation and improve insulin sensitivity and glycogen storage when replacing just 15% of sugar intake.
  • Galactose provides the building blocks for creating tissues in the brain and nervous system, specifically cerebrosides, gangliosides, and mucoproteins. Galactocerebrosides are the main glycoprotein in neuronal myelin, insulating neurons to ensure effective signal transmission.
  • Galactose stops bad bacteria from attaching to tooth enamel, which prevents the formation of plaque and reduces dental caries and cavities. It also protects teeth from mineral loss and enhances oral health while reducing inflammation and preventing bad breath.
  • Prevents premature aging by not sticking to proteins and protecting against free radicals.
  • Provides energy to the brain even when insulin resistance is present, aiding concentration, focus, and memory.
  • Supports cardiovascular health by not damaging blood vessels, increasing good cholesterol, and reducing inflammation.
  • Does not damage cell structures, reduces wrinkles by promoting blood flow and skin elasticity.
  • Provides smooth and sustained energy without causing drops in mental or physical performance.
  • Galactose promotes the growth of good bacteria that help remove toxic ammonia in the body. It also protects the gut from leaks and harmful pathogens like fungi and yeast that cause inflammation.
  • Galactose structures in the body help produce immune lectins. It reduces the replication of viruses and pathogens by removing their fuel source. Galactose has minimal impact on autophagy, which allows the immune system to function properly and keep cells healthy.
  • Galactose doesn't cause insulin elevation because it's not needed for cellular transport. This can help reduce insulin resistance by giving the body a break from using insulin-dependent energy systems.
  • Galactose is metabolized in the liver without using insulin, so it doesn't lead to fat deposition in the liver. Animal studies show that galactose can reduce liver inflammation and improve insulin sensitivity and glycogen storage when replacing just 15% of sugar intake.
  • Galactose provides the building blocks for creating tissues in the brain and nervous system, specifically cerebrosides, gangliosides, and mucoproteins. Galactocerebrosides are the main glycoprotein in neuronal myelin, insulating neurons to ensure effective signal transmission.
  • Galactose stops bad bacteria from attaching to tooth enamel, which prevents the formation of plaque and reduces dental caries and cavities. It also protects teeth from mineral loss and enhances oral health while reducing inflammation and preventing bad breath.

Dr. Coy and Intelligent Sugar Research

Award winning scientist Dr. Johannes Coy discovered the TKTL1 gene. This gene allowed modern humans to evolve from our Neanderthal ancestors.

Homo sapiens produce more neurons in the frontal lobe than Neanderthals due to a single amino acid change in the protein TKTL1.

Unfortunately, our modern diet contains an excess of glucose, fructose and sucrose (‘classic sugars’) and we need half the calories our ancestors needed to survive. This has turned TKTL1 against us.

Classic sugars spike blood sugar, causing inflammation, insulin resistance and disease. The epidemic of lifestyle diseases, like diabetes and cancer, are driven by TKTL1 and our sweet excess. But it doesn’t have to be this way.

“The suffering for those affected, and their relatives (as well as the financial impact on society, and the burden on the next generation) could be avoided, if knowledge about the importance of blood sugar levels were implemented promptly, and our diet adapted to today’s situation with little physical exercise and a lot of stress”

Dr Johannes Coy

Want to know more?

If you would like to learn more about the extensive research supporting the way erythritol impacts wellness, here is a small sample of some studies we think you’ll find interesting.

american journal

Temporal sweetness and side tastes profiles of 16 sweeteners using temporal check- all-that-apply (TCATA)

This study aimed to compare the temporal sweetness and qualitative differences of 15 sweeteners to sucrose. Various sweeteners from different groups were evaluated by 20 participants using the Temporal Check-all-that-Apply (TCATA) method. Sucrose exhibited a rapid onset of sweetness and minimal side tastes. Acesulfame-K, stevia, and luo han guo had prominent bitter, metallic, and chemical tastes. Allulose, erythritol, sorbitol, aspartame, and sucralose had some side tastes but maintained sweetness. Nutritive sweeteners like dextrose, fructose, maltitol, mannitol, sucrose-allulose mixture, palatinose, and xylitol had taste profiles most similar to sucrose in terms of sweetness onset, peak sweetness, decay, and side tastes. This information can help in selecting suitable sucrose substitutes based on taste profiles.

american journal

Letter Regarding Article, “Metabolomic Pattern Predicts Incident Coronary Heart Disease”

This article discusses the use of erythritol, a metabolite, as a predictive marker for coronary heart disease. Erythritol is a naturally occurring noncaloric sweetener and not an artificial sweetener. The presence of erythritol in blood samples cannot be explained by its consumption as a sugar replacement. Studies have shown an association between erythritol levels and impaired glycemic control and central adiposity. The conversion of glucose to erythritol via the pentose-phosphate pathway may play a role in reflecting impaired glycemic control and its related complications. Further research is needed to fully understand the connection between erythritol concentrations and these health conditions.

Erythritol is a pentose-phosphate pathway metabolite and associated with adiposity gain in young adults

This study investigated metabolomic markers associated with the development of central adiposity in young adults. Participants with incident central adiposity gain had higher levels of blood erythritol compared to those with stable adiposity. Participants with higher baseline hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) levels also had significantly higher blood erythritol. Erythritol was found to be synthesized from glucose through the pentose-phosphate pathway, suggesting its potential role in the association between erythritol and obesity in young adults.

Erythritol: An In-Depth Discussion of Its Potential to Be a Beneficial Dietary Component

This article discusses the safety, production, metabolism, and health effects of erythritol, a sugar alcohol used as a food ingredient. It is naturally occurring in plants and can be produced commercially. Erythritol is well tolerated, has negligible energy content, and does not affect glucose or insulin levels. It has the potential to be a beneficial sugar replacement for weight loss and modulation of satiety. Long-term rodent studies indicate that erythritol consumption can lower body weight and adiposity. However, observational studies show a positive association between plasma erythritol and obesity and cardiometabolic disease, which may be due to dysregulated pentose phosphate pathway. Further long-term clinical trials are needed to investigate the effects of chronic erythritol consumption on body weight and metabolic diseases. Overall, current evidence suggests that dietary erythritol can have beneficial effects compared to caloric sugars and address consumer misperceptions.

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Recipes

Explore our fantastic recipes containing Tagatose!

We recommend adding Tagatose to hot or cold beverages, yoghurt, desserts, ice cream, cakes and dressings to promote a stable glucose level, healthy colon and weight loss.